Performance Metrics

Welcome to the City of Lewisville's Performance Metrics portal where we show you live data to determine if we are providing the level of service expected by our residents.

search

Covid-19 Datasets

Confirmed Cases by State:

All Departments open_in_new

View all metrics for a specific department by choosing one below.


Public Safety

The city's top priority is the safety of the public. Safety takes many forms including police, fire and EMS, plus health inspections, water quality (Lewisville treats and distributes its own water) and sewage treatment.

Police

Response Time to Priority 1 Calls
Past 30 days
Metric Descriptionclose

Police department response time to priority 1 (the highest priority) calls (Major Accident, Unconscious Person, Aggravated Assault, Burglary of a Building) compared to the number of priority 1 calls. The city's goal is to have the first police officer arrive at a priority 1 call within 8 minutes of the call being received. Priority 1 calls will typically receive a response of 2 officers. Because these types of calls require more resources (police officers), an increase in the number of these (at the same time) will strain the department's ability to meet the response time goals to other calls.

Goal:

8 mins or less

Fire

Response Time
Past 30 days
Metric Descriptionclose

Fire department response time to priority 1 (the highest priority) calls (Major Accident, Fire, Gas Leak, Breathing Problem) compared to the number of priority 1 calls. The city's goal is to have the first fire personnel arrive at a priority 1 call within 7 minutes of the call being received. Minimum response includes one Engine containing 3 fire personnel, or one Medic containing 2 fire personnel, or both Engine and Medic in some cases. All Lewisville Fire Department emergency personnel also certify as paramedics. That way, no matter which unit (fire engine, ambulance, etc) arrives, medical care begins immediately upon arrival. Because these types of calls often require more resources (firemen, fire engines, ambulances), an increase in the number of these types of calls at the same time will strain the department's ability to meet the response time goals to other calls. Lewisville Fire Department requests assistance from surrounding cities when needed (Mutual Aid Agreement). We also provide assistance to those cities when requested.

Goal:

8 mins or less

EMS

Response Time
Past 30 days
Metric Descriptionclose

Fire department response time to priority 1 (the highest priority) Medical Calls (Medical Emergency, Chest Pain, Hemorrhage, Traumatic Injury) compared to the number of priority 1 calls. The city's goal is to have the first EMS personnel arrive at a priority 1 call within 7 minutes of the call being received. Minimum response includes one Medic containing 2 fire personnel, or both Engine and Medic in some cases. All Lewisville Fire Department emergency personnel also certify as paramedics. That way, no matter which unit (fire engine, ambulance, etc) arrives, medical care begins immediately upon arrival. Because these types of calls often require more resources (paramedics, fire engines, ambulances), an increase in the number of these types of calls at the same time will strain the department's ability to meet the response time goals to other calls. Lewisville Fire Department requests assistance from surrounding cities when needed (Mutual Aid Agreement). We also provide assistance to those cities when requested.

Goal:

8 mins or less

Parks & Recreation

Across all age groups, greater access to parks is associated with lower body mass index and reduced risk of obesity. Children's use of neighborhood parks increases by 400% when parks are closer to home. Our goal as a City is to provide parks within 10 minutes walk for all citizens.

Park Stats

Current
Lewisville has {{data.raw_Parks.Park_Count}} parks totalling
{{data.raw_Parks.Total_Park_Acreage}} acres
Percentage of residents who live within a 10-minute walk of a park
{{walkPercent_total}}%

Park Need

Top 5 Locations Suggested for a New Park

Race/Ethnicity

Park within 10 Minute Walk

Age

Park within 10 Minute Walk

Income

Park within 10 Minute Walk
The data above was compiled by The Trust for Public Land.

Keeping Neighborhoods Maintained

A quality city has a look and feel that makes you want to live there and do business there. In Lewisville, we measure our ability to efficiently fix street problems, sidewalk issues and enforce codes.

Code Enforcement Violations

Open / Closed

Violations

Types (past 30 days)
Past 30 days

Street / Sidewalk Repairs

Work Orders (past 30 days)
Past 30 days
Descriptionclose

This chart includes every street and sidewalk repair opened in the most recent 30 days, or requests previously put on hold that were started in the last 30 days. This includes repairs that are unable to be mapped.

Street / Sidewalk Repairs

Statuses (past 30 days)

Street and sidewalk issues are reported by residents and city staff. The map above shows street and sidewalk service requests that were reported in the past 30 days. They are colored based on whether they were addressed within the goal time. Though projects are evaluated for public safety immediately, some projects not found to be a danger to public safety are placed 'on hold' to include in a larger project for efficiency and cost effectiveness. To view the current streets and sidewalks projects, see the Capital Improvement Dashboard below.

Capital Improvement Program

CIP Dashboard

The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a financial plan for the development, design, and construction of major infrastructure improvements and projects in the City of Lewisville. Generally, the CIP encompasses expensive, nonrecurring projects that have a multi-year life and may require financing. Projects include the construction of new buildings, reconstruction of existing structures, rehabilitation and new construction of streets, water and sewer lines, land purchases, and major equipment purchases. Projects are primarily funded through the sale of general obligation bonds, revenue bonds, interest earnings, impact fees, and available fund balances from the Hotel/Motel, General, Parks and Library Development, and Utility Funds. Budgets for continuing CIP projects are automatically rolled forward into the new fiscal year based on the September 30th balance available in the project, per the budget ordinance. This map provides financial information, project descriptions, and project statuses of each of the projects within the the City's CIP. Click here to open the dashboard to see specific information regarding each project.

Certificate of Occupancy

Certificates of Occupancy assist the City protect our citizens by requiring notification of a change in occupancy of a building, or structure, including construction on existing buildings. A new Certificate of Occupancy is required for: Change of ownership, Change of tenant, Business name change, Change of use, New constructions, and Existing building enlarges/altered. These requirements apply to ALL commercial projects. The map and list above show businesses issued a Certificate of Occupancy within the last TWO MONTHS. Select the SEARCH icon above the list to search for business issued a Certificate of Occupancy within the last SIX MONTHS. Follow this link for more information about Certificates of Occupancy.

Development Activity Report

On any given day, multiple development projects continue in the City. They include new development, zoning changes, expansions, and more. This tool provides details on current and recently completed construction projects including type and status. For more detailed information and definitions for project types and statuses, please visit the City's Development Activity Report page.

All Metrics